Article: The Kraken: when myth encounters science

Are sea monsters real? Can someone "release the Kraken"? History and literature are filled with a myriad of stories about deadly beasts that sink ships and eat people. This article presents a theory that may explain as least some of the (less deadly and dangerous) stories. link to The Kraken: when myth encounters science

Website: Lost Plays Database

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Did you know that humanity has lost much of our literature through history? The Lost Plays Database discusses the dramatic losses from English theater in the Renaissance (specifically 1570-1642). It's a solid research tool and a source of a lot of interesting information on the plays that have been lost from that period. link to… Continue reading Website: Lost Plays Database

Article: How the Mona Lisa Escaped Destruction During World War II

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Unfortunately, a great deal of art that existed before World War II was destroyed before the war was over. The Louvre was not willing to let that happen to their collections. Particular attention was given to ensuring the survival of the Mona Lisa. This article from Mental Floss details the work done to save the… Continue reading Article: How the Mona Lisa Escaped Destruction During World War II

Website: My Modern Met

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This website has so much information that it can get a little overwhelming, but luckily it also has a really effective search function. If you are looking for anything from humanities to art history to artistic techniques, My Modern Met may have what you need. link to My Modern Met

Article: Illuminated Manuscripts

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Arguably one of the most beautiful art forms, creating illuminated manuscripts was (and is) a time consuming labor of love. Unfortunately many Medieval and Renaissance books have been cut up so that the art could be collected by itself, but fortunately there are a number of complete volumes that still survive. In this article, the… Continue reading Article: Illuminated Manuscripts

Website: The Louvre (English Version)

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For some people (including me), the Paris's Louvre is pretty much THE museum. It singlehandedly holds the Mona Lisa, the Nike of Samothrace, the Venus de Milo, the Raft of the Medusa, and many other wondrous artifacts. Every time Paris floods, I worry about this place; but they saved their treasures from World War II,… Continue reading Website: The Louvre (English Version)

Website: Smarthistory: The Center for Public Art History

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Smarthistory has a number of excellent articles and videos about the history of art. No matter what you are researching, this is a great site to check as their information deals with diverse cultures and time periods. For example, at the time I'm posting this, the first two topics on their landing page deal with… Continue reading Website: Smarthistory: The Center for Public Art History

Website: Google Arts and Culture

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If you are looking for a specific work of art, and you're not sure what museum holds it, Google Arts and Culture is a good place to start. They have high resolution images (that can be zoomed in) of more than 2000 works. In addition, they have information on those works, as well as articles… Continue reading Website: Google Arts and Culture

Website: The British Museum: Collections Search

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The British Museum has an absolutely amazing collection. When looking at any large museum, it can be a little overwhelming. A good first step when using any museum's site for research is to find the option to search their collections. You can search by specific names (if you are looking for a specific work) or… Continue reading Website: The British Museum: Collections Search

Website: Renaissance: The Elizabethan World

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This site provides a great variety of information about the life and culture of Elizabethan England (my favorite part is their section on Sumptuary Laws mandated who could wear what). Much of their information comes from original sources--documents from Elizabethan England that they have (in many cases) transcribed onto their site. They also have a… Continue reading Website: Renaissance: The Elizabethan World