Article: After 25 Years at Sea, Shipwrecked Lego Pieces Are Still Washing Ashore on Beaches in England

When you think of Legos shipwrecks and environmental disasters are probably not the first thing that comes to mind. However, that's what this article is about. Apparently, a shipwreck a couple of decades ago dropped 5 million Legos (amongst other things) into the sea off of the coast of England in what has come to… Continue reading Article: After 25 Years at Sea, Shipwrecked Lego Pieces Are Still Washing Ashore on Beaches in England

Article: The True Story of the Monuments Men

Time can be unkind to art, and this was particularly apparent during World War II. Many amazing (and culturally significant) works of art were destroyed in a conflict that leveled cities and destroyed countless lives. Additionally, beyond horrific human cost, World War II was the largest art heist the world has ever seen. Although it… Continue reading Article: The True Story of the Monuments Men

Article: Lost Vorticist Masterpiece Found Hidden Beneath Another Painting

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There are many paintings that have been lost to time. Sometimes the art world is lucky enough to get one of them back--or at least to find out what happened to it. This article discusses the case of a painting (this one by English avant-guard artist Helen Saunders) that was found underneath another painting during… Continue reading Article: Lost Vorticist Masterpiece Found Hidden Beneath Another Painting

Article: Creating a Full Palette of Blues

Color is an essential part of art, and blue is a color that is both commonly used and important. In this article from Smithsonian Magazine, they discuss the discovery of the source of Cobalt Blue, as well as the creation of Prussian Blue. The development of these colors for artistic uses increased the variety of… Continue reading Article: Creating a Full Palette of Blues

Article: After More Than 150 Years, Sculptor Edmonia Lewis Finally Gets Her Degree

Lewis, Edmonia-Hiawatha, 1868

Sculptress Edmonia Lewis created amazing works despite the racism and sexism prevalent in the art world of the 19th Century. This article from Smithsonian Magazine details the challenges she faced in getting her college degree, and her college is now trying to at least partially right a wrong that was made more than 150 years… Continue reading Article: After More Than 150 Years, Sculptor Edmonia Lewis Finally Gets Her Degree

Article: The Redemption of Rosa Bonheur

Bonheur, Rosa-The Horse Fair, 1852-1855

Rosa Bonheur was a remarkable 19th Century French artist. She specialized in realistic depictions of animals, and her art was celebrated around the world. Unfortunately, her art has been largely forgotten in her home of France. This article from Smithsonian Magazine discusses efforts to rediscover her art and career. link to The Redemption of Rosa… Continue reading Article: The Redemption of Rosa Bonheur

Article: Why Were Medieval Knights Always Fighting Snails?

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Have you ever doodled in the margins of something you're writing? If so, then Medieval snail fights might interest you--yes, I said snails. The knight vs. snail motif is a recurring one in the margins of Medieval manuscripts, and researchers have yet to figure out why. However, this article from Smithsonian Magazine gives an interesting… Continue reading Article: Why Were Medieval Knights Always Fighting Snails?

Article: Scientists Recreate Cleopatra’s Favorite Perfume

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What did the past smell like? This is a question that this article from Smithsonian Magazine tries to address. While it focusses on the attempts to recreate Cleopatra's perfume, it also talks about the importance of scent to culture and ways that we might recapture the scents of the past. link to Scientists Recreate Cleopatra's… Continue reading Article: Scientists Recreate Cleopatra’s Favorite Perfume

Article: Ancient Rock Art Depicting Divine Procession Discovered in Secret Chamber Beneath Turkish House

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This article from Smithsonian Magazine showcases the breadth of the influence of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. After saving an carved stone panel from looters, archeologists uncovered evidence that the Neo-Assyrian culture interacted with the Arameans in what is today Turkey. link to Ancient Rock Art Depicting Divine Procession...

Article: How Italy Is Bringing Its Rustic Villages Back to Life

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Unfortunately, not all art is valued all of the time. In Italy, the traditional villages and their traditional way of life were seen as old and tired in the first half of the twentieth century, and many people moved to the city for a faster-paced, hopefully more lucrative life. Things are changing now, and Italy… Continue reading Article: How Italy Is Bringing Its Rustic Villages Back to Life

Article: The Medieval Queens Whose Daring, Murderous Reigns Were Quickly Forgotten

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Brunhild and Fredegund were queens of the Merovingian Dynasty. They survived the assassinations of their kings and maneuvered their way through the political power plays of their times. Unfortunately, both them and the dynasty they belonged to are often left out of discussions of the Middle Ages. This article from Smithsonian Magazine shines a light… Continue reading Article: The Medieval Queens Whose Daring, Murderous Reigns Were Quickly Forgotten

Article: 3-D Scans Show 30,000-Year-Old Stone Sculpture Dug Up in Austria Likely Came From Italy

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The Venus of Willendorf got its name from the place in Austria where it was found. However, this new article from Smithsonian Magazine, presents that theory that the Venus may have actually been made in Italy and transported to Austria by a group of hunter-gatherers. link to 3-D Scans Show 30,000-Year Old Stone Sculpture...

Website: Smithsonian Magazine

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For students of culture, the online home of the Smithsonian Magazine is an incredible resource. They have searchable sections on Smart News, History, Science, Innovation, Arts & Culture, Travel, At the Smithsonian, Photos, Videos, and Games. Wherever your interests lie within the Humanities, the Smithsonian Magazine would be a good place to start your research.… Continue reading Website: Smithsonian Magazine

Article: Sculptor Edmonia Lewis Shattered Gender and Race Expectations in 19th-Century America

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This article from Smithsonian Magazine gives a great overview of the career of an amazing sculptress who fought to create her career in the white male dominated art world of the 19th Century. As a person of color, Edmonia Lewis had to contend with racism; as a women, she had to work against sexism; and… Continue reading Article: Sculptor Edmonia Lewis Shattered Gender and Race Expectations in 19th-Century America

Article: Meet the ‘Most Important’ Jewish Woman in Medieval England

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Licoricia of Winchester was a moneylender in 13th Century England. In an age that stigmatized both Jews and women in business, Licoricia weathered much adversity, created a successful career, and catered to many affluent clients (including the king). Now, her home town of Winchester is erecting a statue to immortalize this amazing woman and to… Continue reading Article: Meet the ‘Most Important’ Jewish Woman in Medieval England